Should teachers be concerned with copyright infringement?

22 Mar

I have gotten many lesson plan ideas, activities, or games to use in the numerous lesson plans I have written. I am sure that I will continue using the public domain of the Internet to collect ideas, show my ideas, and always have something new in my classroom. But should I or other teachers be worried about copyright infringement? “Copyright is a “deal” that the American people, through Congress, made with the writers and publishers of books,” (Vaidhyanathan, 21). Teachers have numerous online, text, references, and resources for developing unit plans and activities for their students.

If it’s from the online public domain we don’t have to be worried about copyright because all rights to the ideas expire once they are on the Internet and anyone is allowed to use and distribute the ideas, activities, or lesson plans on the Internet. This is important to know because from one idea generates another and since there are numerous ways to teach a lesson the more teachers can share the more we are able to collaborate. Thinkfinity.org is a free online public domain for teachers to find, share, and connect with other teachers. It is a search engine website that only generates to other teaching websites, links, and online resources. It is an absolutely amazing domain to look through for any lesson plan. You can search a topic, a subject, or even curriculum standards and pages of information will turn up at the click of a button.

http://thinkfinity.org/

Although most things educators find on the Internet are safe to use we should still be aware of what copyright means.

Copyright was created as a policy that balanced the interests of authors, publishers, and readers…Copyright is more than one right. It is a       “bundle” of rights that includes the exclusive rights to make copies, authorize others to make copies, create derivative works such as translations and displays in other media, sell the work, perform the work publicly, and petition a court for relief in case others infringe on any of these rights. (Vaidhyanathan, 20-21)

Since teachers mostly like making numerous copies of worksheets or display different forms of media in the classroom some may begin to worry about possible infringement. However, the online public domain makes it harder (not impossible) to break copyright laws.

http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/tech/tech121.shtml

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