Tag Archives: Copyright

Is anything ever completely original?

25 Mar

When posting on YouTube users have to be careful when being imposed with copyright infringement. “The way to ensure that your video doesn’t infringe someone else’s copyright is to use your skills and imagination to create something completely original,” (Copyright Tips on YouTube). But how do you create something “completely original” when most people generate ideas from another piece of work because there is some inspiration behind the new idea.

Online YouTube offers self-help pages about preventing copyright, what copyright is, and what happens when you upload infringing content. YouTube has these pages as disclaimers to project their website and others original pieces of work. They also offer this disclaimer,

DISCLAIMER: WE ARE NOT YOUR ATTORNEYS, AND THE INFORMATION WE PRESENT HERE IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE. WE PRESENT THIS INFORMATION FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY.

On YouTube all videos, clips, and audio have to be original works. However, aren’t there numerous videos that are remakes of other videos or responses to other videos? Are they “completely original” works if they are responses or reactions to other original works? I wonder what exact regulations or guidelines are written out they decided exactly what videos are “completely original” and what are copies.

In the chapter, “Copyright and American culture: Ideas, expressions, and democracy,” by Siva Vaidhyanathan says, “Copyright was created as a policy that balanced the interests of authors, publishers, and readers,” (Vaidhtanathan, 20). It is a way to protect the creators of the “completely original” pieces of work. It is hard to believe that a lot of videos on YouTube are remaining online and are considered original pieces of work. I have seen numerous videos that are remakes, responses, or paradoxes of other videos.

What makes some thing “completely original” if it’s a response to another video or the idea was inspired from another video?

https://www.youtube.com/t/howto_copyright

Should teachers be concerned with copyright infringement?

22 Mar

I have gotten many lesson plan ideas, activities, or games to use in the numerous lesson plans I have written. I am sure that I will continue using the public domain of the Internet to collect ideas, show my ideas, and always have something new in my classroom. But should I or other teachers be worried about copyright infringement? “Copyright is a “deal” that the American people, through Congress, made with the writers and publishers of books,” (Vaidhyanathan, 21). Teachers have numerous online, text, references, and resources for developing unit plans and activities for their students.

If it’s from the online public domain we don’t have to be worried about copyright because all rights to the ideas expire once they are on the Internet and anyone is allowed to use and distribute the ideas, activities, or lesson plans on the Internet. This is important to know because from one idea generates another and since there are numerous ways to teach a lesson the more teachers can share the more we are able to collaborate. Thinkfinity.org is a free online public domain for teachers to find, share, and connect with other teachers. It is a search engine website that only generates to other teaching websites, links, and online resources. It is an absolutely amazing domain to look through for any lesson plan. You can search a topic, a subject, or even curriculum standards and pages of information will turn up at the click of a button.

http://thinkfinity.org/

Although most things educators find on the Internet are safe to use we should still be aware of what copyright means.

Copyright was created as a policy that balanced the interests of authors, publishers, and readers…Copyright is more than one right. It is a       “bundle” of rights that includes the exclusive rights to make copies, authorize others to make copies, create derivative works such as translations and displays in other media, sell the work, perform the work publicly, and petition a court for relief in case others infringe on any of these rights. (Vaidhyanathan, 20-21)

Since teachers mostly like making numerous copies of worksheets or display different forms of media in the classroom some may begin to worry about possible infringement. However, the online public domain makes it harder (not impossible) to break copyright laws.

http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/tech/tech121.shtml