Tag Archives: Rewards

Who am I according to Target?

5 Mar

Walking into Target, to purchase a new pair of heels, a new Chelsea Handler book, a memory card for my camera, a pack of twizzlers, OPI nailpolish, and new Covergirl Mascara. What is Andrew Pole thinking of me?

Instantly, they must know I am a girl and that I am around the ages of 17- 24 because the novel I purchased, the heels, and the makeup. Am I going to be comfortable with Target knowing this about me? Or is it beneficial because I will get coupons ad ads showing me the products I like that are on sale or have different promotions?

As I read the article “How Companies Learn Your Secrets,” from the New York Times by Charles Duhigg. I began to think of how different stores, websites, and companies have access to numerous pieces of information on me even if I had only shopped there once or twice. This made me think of the information people can get off your Facebook after only being on your page once or twice. Viwers can see your sex, birthday, relationships, interests, and email address. All on the Internet and now public information.

This article fascinated me because I can only imagine how many stores and online websites have different identities on me because of what I buy. They must know my exact habits of my online shopping since every ad on the side of my computer always relates to the products I was just putting in my shopping cart or checking into my wish list. I have noticed that one of my habit loops is the payday. I know that on the Friday’s I get paid I ready to go buy something, and this could be a habit for others my age. Can Target, or other stores, tell the days I get paid based on the days I shop every two weeks?

Will they be sending me ads every two weeks? (Cue) Knowing that I am more likely to spend money on the Fridays I get paid (Routine.) Then enjoy buying myself something because I worked hard and earned the money (Reward). How are we supposed to prevent them from triggering our cues that are imbedded into our routines?

Stores like Target and similar competitors have begun to create these computer-generating identities of us, but are customers going to try to prevent these customized ads by trying to break the system or encourage them? It is hard to say which side of this argument presents the greener grass or the sweeter deal. Every customer loves to have coupons or promotions for them, so aren’t these corporations helping us to help them?

As a future teacher I will be regularly buying classroom supplies, stickers, crafts, holiday items, books, and other things I will need for my classroom. If stores like Target generate this profile that place me as teacher it could help me save money and help me to see what Target has to offer compared to other stores. Target would be sending me ads and promotions for the things I needed. Yes, it would be mixed with things I didn’t necessarily need. But, if all stores did this like Target, Walmart, A.C. Moore, and Kmart, they would be able to show their consumers what they have to offer for their particular needs. Then after comparing all of these customized ads for a teacher it would be easier to decide what I would buy from each store. Isn’t it like these stores are doing the work for me when I am hunting for a bargain?

These corporations are activating our cues that fit within our routines and create our reward by buying on a regular basis at a good price. Is it weird that these corporations are creating these identities and knowing about my life? Yes. But, wouldn’t it be much easier to show us the things we need or want verses looking among numerous stores to find the items? People put too much information on social networking cites and if they aren’t concerned with that information being on the internet then they shouldn’t be concerned with the corporations like Target trying to identify their shopping profile or identity.

This was mentioned in the article and I wanted to find out if this had really happened and this is what I stumbled on:

How Target Figured Out A Teen Girl Was Pregnant Before Her Father Did